Grass fed beef, part 2

This continues our cow mini-series.

With a pasture full of momma cows and a randy bull I was all set to produce some beef cows. However The Lord always finds it amusing when you make plans that involve his miracles (conception). Fortunately I think he gives you what you need despite you plans and pleas. Once I was ready to produce steers, I literally had nothing but female cows. Of course I want to keep female cows for future breeding so I went a year with 0 cows for beef, and the following year with few. Good news long term, bad news short term.

Tomorrow part 3

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Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he’s a farmer.


Grass fed beef, part 1

You wouldn’t know it to read this blog but the reason we are here is to produce grass fed beef for sale direct to the customer. Of course we also raise pigs, veggies, chickens, and children so all that makes it into the blog. The reason you wouldn’t know about the beef is because we haven’t produced any beef for sale in a few years. Yes I have sold a few cows to the market to cull out some bloodlines I didn’t like and I have sold some cows with attitude problems because so didn’t want to deal with them but to actually take a cow to the abbatoir and get back meat in packaging has been way too long.

There are a few reasons for this.

1. We had a big reset on our herd. We sold off some cows I wasn’t pleased with and didn’t want to carry forward into our genetics. Part of the reason for culling so aggressively was we had an even bigger reset on our pastures and began daily rotations with the cows, which has been well documented here. With a new grazing method, we needed less cows eating grass till we were good and established. So I culled back to just our breeding stock and a bull.

Tomorrow, part 2.

Dan Moore on EmailDan Moore on FacebookDan Moore on GoogleDan Moore on Twitter

Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he’s a farmer.


Too much politics lately

So here is the lighter side of politics. What your favorite adult beverage, or as we call them at my house, “Daddy drinks” means about your political leanings.

For the record, I drink, in this order:

  • WL Weller 12 year bourbon
  • Knob Creek bourbon
  • Red wine (they make different kinds?)
  • Zaya Rum

 

Dan Moore on EmailDan Moore on FacebookDan Moore on GoogleDan Moore on Twitter

Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he’s a farmer.


Problems with meat processing facilities

“Eliminating bacteria entirely is always the goal, but in reality, it’s simply not feasible.”

In what world, besides in an operating room, is zero bacteria a goal. The more we kill all the bacteria, the more we enable the bad bacteria.

Article on the USDA and inspections

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Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he’s a farmer.


Venison

Yesterday, after breakfast and setting up paddocks for the cows, the inmates and I went to work on the two deer that Spork and I had put in the cooler. Brian had never butchered a deer, while John had some experience. Everyone was an expert by the end though. We put together an assembly line and knocked out both deer in about an hour and a half. John broke down the halves into major cuts, the Brian and I trimmed off all the meat and handed it to The Princess who was in charge of grinding the hamburger. The Spork stuffed the vacuum seal bags and sealed and labeled. It was a true group effort.

Except for the tenderloin, we ground everything into ground meat. The Mrs tells me that we are almost out of ground pork so the timing is right. Now she can mix venison in with the remaining pork and stretch it out.

Dan Moore on EmailDan Moore on FacebookDan Moore on GoogleDan Moore on Twitter

Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he’s a farmer.


How to stop heartburn easily and without medicine

As many of you know, I’ve lost a bunch of weight. January 2013 my darling SWMBO decided that she (and therefor I) was going on a diet. Having been in a household where diets came and went continuously, I had no issue with a diet. What I did have an issue with was having to give up ice cream. Not because it was yummy (it is) but because I used ice cream to treat my heartburn. I probably ate ice cream 4-5 times per week, plus I took antacids another once or twice per week. For those of you doing math, yes, I had heartburn nearly every day. This didn’t really worry me as my father had suffered with heartburn all the years of my life. It came with the job. However with SWMBO saying we were giving up carbs, I was terribly worried that my heartburn would get out of control. So what was the result?

With trepidation I gave up carbs and on day one I had to take an antacid to get through the day. On day three it occurred to me I had somehow had a good day with no heartburn. By day 10 I’d forgotten what it was like to have heartburn. Folks, I gave up carbs and my chronic heartburn disappeared, period. I can recreate it whenever I want simply by dosing on carbs for a day. With all this in mind, I thought I’d share this blog post about heartburn. I never made it past step 2 so I cannot comment on the rest, but I can tell you step one worked like a champ and no doctor every mentioned anything about carbs, exactly as this guy describes.

Here is the link to the blog post.

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Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he’s a farmer.


Back from school

I’ve just returned from 2 and 1/2 days in Jackson, MS at the Stockman Grass Farmers grazing and finishing school with Annabal Pordodomingo. I have a book full of facts and pages of notes. Most of what I learned will be used in my cattle management but some of it I’ll be sharing here with everyone. Look for details as time goes on of the things I’ve learned that I can share with you.

It’s good to be home. I do hope we don’t get another cold spell because we’ve had water problems galore while I’ve been gone. I had to lean heavily on Miguel while I was gone to get all the water issues (read: broken pipes) resolved. The bad part was I just learned today that he’s been sick the entire time I was gone, something he failed to mention. Thanks to Miguel for toughing it out and keeping things good for me on the farm.

Also thanks to the inmates John and Brian who kept the animals fed and in the correct corral. We’ll be dressing deer tomorrow in addition to catching up on all the work I missed this week. Hopefully it’ll stop raining long enough to get some work done.

Dan Moore on EmailDan Moore on FacebookDan Moore on GoogleDan Moore on Twitter

Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he’s a farmer.