Thin grass

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The grass in yesterday’s paddock looked a bit thin when I walked it a few days ago. Apparently the cows felt the same as there was some grazing under the fence by the waterer. I didn’t walk the whole paddock to see if the trend continued since most of the overgrazing appeared to be clover so it wasn’t a crisis. As we continue up the hill the grass thickens up nicely so we will keep the paddocks the same size going forward until we see how the cows react.

Speaking of going up hill, pulling the mineral feeder is getting interesting. The next 5 paddocks are going uphill and the mineral feeder hasn’t gotten any lighter.

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Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he's a farmer.

Another foggy morning

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The cows are just barely visible through the mist this morning. It was pretty neat watching them appear.

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Here they are a minute later as we moved paddocks.

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And now moving back down the new paddock grazing. Note the nice sunrise in the background. As usual, the picture doesn’t do it justice. Mornings like this make the other days worthwhile.

The grass still looks very good. Its not growing as crazily as it was, but I think we still have plenty of growth coming. We cut out 6 acres for winter forage so this will be our first experiment with winter grazing. The grazing pressure looks just right and the cows continue to perform. Tomorrow the new fence charger should show up and we should be back in business.

Dan Moore on EmailDan Moore on FacebookDan Moore on GoogleDan Moore on Twitter
Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he's a farmer.

More fence charger woes

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This is what met me this morning when I moved the cows. The fence, with the 3rd string emergency backup charger was dead as a hammer. No voltage. Luckily the cows had not noticed yet.

Spork and I proceeded to redo all the jumper wires and ride all the fence in search of the short. After about 20 minutes we had disconnected everything from the main wire which is only about 20 feet long. After all that work we had this result.

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Sigh.

Get out the tester and start testing what was left. Another few minutes and I found this.

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Arghh! Deer again. Every time we loose the fence its deer as the cause. I believe venison will be in the freezer this winter.

So after that quick fix.

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Yeah! Now that will light those critters up.

After all of that. We were rewarded with this sunrise. All is good.

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Dan Moore on EmailDan Moore on FacebookDan Moore on GoogleDan Moore on Twitter
Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he's a farmer.

Fence charger woes

It doesn’t take long for the cows to figure out that a fence charger is down. They must have a special sense for when you aren’t prepared.

We are running with the old 6 joule Stayfix charger since the new Kencove charger has given up the ghost. Right now we have 1.3 Kv on the line and the cows have chosen to just walk right through it. Luckily they only went through their back fence and there was no cattle wrangling this morning. Unluckily they broke the back fence wire so there’s that to fix. The interns are jumping in an even older box but isolating the paddock so its only running a couple of paddocks. That should get the voltage back up until I can get the 24 joule going again. Gotta go find the receipt for this Kencove charger in my shoebox of receipts.

Dan Moore on EmailDan Moore on FacebookDan Moore on GoogleDan Moore on Twitter
Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he's a farmer.

Yesterday’s haul

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16 watermelons yesterday with more coming today. I LOVE watermelon. Remind me of that on the processing of about the 13th one.

This batch will be some watermelon wine, I hope. There’s no more room in the freezer and I can only feed the kids so much.

Dan Moore on EmailDan Moore on FacebookDan Moore on GoogleDan Moore on Twitter
Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he's a farmer.

Ready for winter

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Last winter I had some frozen fruit in the freezer. I wasn’t really sure what to do with it. I stumbled across fruit smoothies in my Vitamix blender as a way to use up the fruit. I mixed it with the kefir we make from our cow and tried it out. The kids were wildly enthusiastic so this year I decided to prepare for winter. I think I am done.

Dan Moore on EmailDan Moore on FacebookDan Moore on GoogleDan Moore on Twitter
Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he's a farmer.

A merry chase

Today, while moving and watering the cows, I made a mistake. I thought we had back fenced the cows into their new paddock. Thinking the cows were safely in their new paddock I went to work on their waterer which was leaking, which required me opening the pasture gate.

Then, Brian pointed out that the hot wire had no juice, none. So off we went to discover the source of the problem. After 15 minutes of fencing checks, we came back to the paddock where the cows were. Were, as in used to be, is the key word as they had disappeared. Off we went to discover their whereabouts and shortly we discovered the cows in the woods behind the wood boiler. The cows were having a merry time, crashing through the trees, eating anything that looked good, etc. They very much looked like a group of sailors just hitting port.

Brian took the gator and I went on foot with a stick I found to use to herd the cows. We chased until reaching the neighbors house, where we were able to turn the cows around and herd them back to the barn. 15 minutes and a few bad words later we had them at least in the barn yard. Phew! Crisis averted.

Just another day on the farm.

Dan Moore on EmailDan Moore on FacebookDan Moore on GoogleDan Moore on Twitter
Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he's a farmer.

7125 Old Stage Road Raleigh NC