Twitter is back

So my auto poster thingy quit working last fall. It’s the software that automagically takes my WordPress blog post and pushes it out to Facebook, Twitter, whatever. When it broke, it was for no reason I could discern.

Not to worry, I just turned it off, and installed a new plugin. A bit of work and Facebook was back up and running. Twitter? Well, it had about 5 pages of instructions. I’ll do that tomorrow.

And only six months later, tomorrow finally arrives. I’d completely forgotten about Twitter not working. I went onto our Twitter page and the last post was October 2016. Oops! Sometimes being a farmer nerd is hard. So this is a welcome back to the Twitterverse. It’s also a test so I can see if I’m done nerding for today so I can go farm instead.

Dan Moore on EmailDan Moore on FacebookDan Moore on GoogleDan Moore on Twitter
Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he's a farmer.

Pork Osso Bucco Ragout

Last week left me without much time to cook. Due to Hurricane Matthew most meals were eaten at friends houses or out. Then the end of the week was so busy with obligations that dinner was out once again.  Now the evenings are longer and cooking is something I want to fill our home as well as our stomachs.

NCF carries pork osso bucco for $4.50 lb. Osso bucco comes in all sizes, from small to large. Personally I prefer the smaller more delicate cuts.They take less time to cook and are very flavorful. Fortunately we carry all sizes in the store.  The tomatoes, potatoes and sage came from the NCF garden making this a fairly inexpensive dinner for our family. Ragout is a french stew of vegetables usually served with meat.  I served the Ragout on a bed of garlic mashed potatoes although rice polenta or noodles would serve wonderfully.

 

 

Store Manager and resident chef at Ninja Cow Farm LLC
Lucy lives and works on Ninja Cow Farm. Most days you'll find her tending to the garden or working in the store. She's cooked in restaurants and as a Personal Chef.

Snow is coming and we have milk

I don’t know what kind of snow we are going to have.

Usually when it snows in North Carolina, it is something akin to this:

However, the largest snow I can recall came in March in the 80s so who knows what it will do. If we don’t get the above, maybe it will be more like this. 

Enough snow to disturb the parents is usually welcome amongst the short people here at the farm.

Regardless, we have lots of milk on hand and plenty of other goodies for some warm meals on the next few cold days. We’ll be open from now till 5pm today with the kids working and taking care of you when you show up. Stop by and get ready for the wintry weather!

Dan Moore on EmailDan Moore on FacebookDan Moore on GoogleDan Moore on Twitter
Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he's a farmer.

To our vegan and vegetarian friends

When we opened our farm up to the public, we had a bit of trepidation oh who would show up. Beer bellied BBQ guys? Health nuts? Atkins diet people? Soccer moms? Grand parents? Weston A. Price people? Liberals? Conservatives? Libertarians? What kind of people will walk through our door.

Several years later the answer has been, yes. We have them all. And they are all amazing people with their own interesting stories and varied backgrounds. And at the end of the day, if they are polite to my kids then we’re tickled to have them here, one and all.

But there is one group of people that we worried might show up. The one that caused the most questions from friends and peers. “What are you going to do is vegetarians/vegans show up?” I mean, we are a meat farm. While everyone here lives a very happy life, there is an end date on pretty much everything on the farm. And we don’t hide it, we celebrate it. What if protestors show up? It was, and is, one of our bigger concerns of running a public farm.

But here is the odd thing. We have lots of vegetarians and vegans as customers. And they are wonderful people. Some bring their non-vegetarian family for a visit. But more often, we get customers who are here because their doctor has sent them here. They’ve been vegetarian/vegan for 5,10,20 or more years and they now have major health problems that they are learning came from their diet. This isn’t my opinion, this is what they are telling me walking in the door. Morally, they are VERY unhappy about eating meat. But they are at a point that they HAVE to have protein to get any quality of life back. Their doctor has told them so, their now non-vegan research has told them so and usually once they introduced meat back into their diet, it was like turning on a light switch. The change was that quick. So the results are telling them so. But it’s still against everything they believe in.

You’d think this would be the part where the meat farmer, long maligned by the vegan/vegetarian movement, pokes them in the eye and says how right we meat eaters are and how wrong they are. After all, there is quite a forceful movement to try to make meat bad in the public eye. Why not exact a little righteous revenge? There are a couple of problems with that.

One, all I feel is sorrow for them when I hear of the health issues they are dealing with. They are chronic and life altering. They are, at this point usually, not going to completely go away either. The damage is not repairable. Yes, eating meat is making them feel much better but they’ll never be like they were before becoming vegetarian/vegan. Trust me, I’ve heard the stories first hand.

Two, one of my best friends is a vegetarian (Hi Jim!). I’ve learned as much from him as I have from anyone in my life. He’s an awesome person I’m blessed to know. And when I’m with him and we go out to eat, I eat the vegetarian meal. Not because he’s ever asked me to or expects me to, but because I like vegetables too. I’m a vegetarian myself. I just usually happen to have some meat on the plate to accompany my vegetables. Some of my favorite meals are the vegetable portion of the meal. So big deal, I’ll eat my veggies that day.

All this vegetarian thing had been rolling around in my mind because of all the people we meet here, it’s the vegetarians and vegans that have been the most unexpected. I hadn’t really crystalized this into a post or a real opinion. It’s just been floating around in the grey matter. And then I happened across this podcast, called Lierre Kieth on the vegetarian myth. It was produced back in  2012. I listened to it while driving to Siler City and back yesterday, taking our latest cow to the processor. Listening to Lierre was like having one of our customers standing in the store telling their story to me. One I’ve heard by now many times. Only this time, there is a book to go along with the story.

When we started having customers to the farm, I didn’t expect all these terrible stories. I also didn’t expect to see the sorrow in people’s eyes when they are forced by health to go against their morals and eat meat. I can see their struggle and it’s not fun to watch. I try to let them know how good of a life our animals have. To know that without customers, the animals would never have lived at all. We don’t breed pets.

We talk about how humane the last day is for an animal. How they are treated at the processor, etc. How animals are part of the nutrient cycling system designed by God as a perfect closed loop system. Anything to help them overcome years of propaganda saying that eating meat is evil, period. This change is akin to being a devout Christian and having to admit and profess that there is no God. It’s not easy. However there is only so much I can do in the few short minutes I have with them. So now, I can point them to this post and this podcast, and this book. I think Lierre did a good job of explaining the problems and pointing out her view of the solutions. It’s not a perfect argument and I don’t agree with everything she said but it’s worth a listen. And if this helps just one of our recovering vegetarians, then it was worth it.

Since this was a heavy post with lots of feelings and stuff (not what you expect from me) here is something to make you smile.

Guy with vegan tatoo eating a meat hot dog
Note the tatoo “vegan” on his arm. Then note the hotdog.
Dan Moore on EmailDan Moore on FacebookDan Moore on GoogleDan Moore on Twitter
Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he's a farmer.

At Last Oven Pastrami

The Big Finally is here lets make some Pastrami!

Last week I brined my brisket, Sunday night I slice it & made corned beef. Today were are going to use the power of smoked paprika to make this brisket into something magical.  This whole week I have struggled back in forth. Do I cold smoke to I hot smoke, then it came to me. Most people do not have access to a smoker hot or cold, they do however have access to the grocery store & an oven. The whole premise of how I cook is to make it easy for those at home to follow and do the same. Let’s go!

As you can see the left over portion of my brisket is small, There will only be a few servings. Next time I make this I will order one of the giant 12 pounders and make enough for left overs.

 

Store Manager and resident chef at Ninja Cow Farm LLC
Lucy lives and works on Ninja Cow Farm. Most days you'll find her tending to the garden or working in the store. She's cooked in restaurants and as a Personal Chef.

We are open today 2-6pm

It’s not all fun and games around here. We’ve actually been getting some work done. Restocking freezers, doing taxes, painting, buying freezers, planning the new layout, picking up goodies from our farmers, testing a new point of sale system, sampling new goodies.

Well I guess we did all play Superfight the other night. It was slightly less organized than the picture above.

Come see us today. We have lots of everything, including pet milk.

Dan Moore on EmailDan Moore on FacebookDan Moore on GoogleDan Moore on Twitter
Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he's a farmer.

Corned Beef & Cabbage

St Patrick’s day is getting closer do you have your Brisket yet. The good new is that you still have time. The recipe I posted last week only takes 3-5 days. For you last minute folks out there (like me) this one is for you.

The dark color is due to not using nitrates in the brining process. I used beet juice unfortunately it was not dark enough to preserve the color

 

This past weekend my family hosted a farm game night for all of us that live here at NCF. We served the Corned Beef with Cabbage, it was a big hit.  It scored a solid 8 out of 10, every last morsel of the beef was consumed.

Mark & Dustin grabbing their dinners.
SWMBO didn’t even get a bite.

The only issue we had was coloring and it may have been due to my beet juice not having enough of the coloring in it. My beet juice was not nearly as colorful as other brands I’ve seen out there. In fact it was downright pale.

 

 

Store Manager and resident chef at Ninja Cow Farm LLC
Lucy lives and works on Ninja Cow Farm. Most days you'll find her tending to the garden or working in the store. She's cooked in restaurants and as a Personal Chef.

7125 Old Stage Road Raleigh NC