Tag Archives: grass fed

Turkey Brine & Spice Butter

My husband and I have joked around for a while now that we are the Green Acres Family. We lived for several years next to Disney in Celebration, FL For a few of those years I had the privilege of living next to one of my closests friends. We often said that we were going to dig a tunnel between our houses for rainy days. I really miss those days especially during Thanksgiving & Christmas. We’d run back & forth all day & night sharing ingredients.

I stole this from one of Dan’s previous blogs.

Jess & I have a love of Martha Stewart Recipes and that is where I go for my Turkey Brine & Spice Butter Recipe.  She shared this recipe with me years ago & I use it often both on Turkey & Chicken.  I’ll add pictures to this once Thanksgiving is past, gotta make sure that you guys have a great recipe to use for the actual holiday.

Lengua Tacos

Organ meats are a new item in my house. The lead in charge of this are two unlikely suspects. Two that forever have told me to go eat my hippie foods. My husband and our daughter, Rutabaga.   Earlier this spring Rutabaga decided she liked grossing people out by eating weird things.  Her new favorite food coming from this is Lengua or Cow’s tongue tacos.

Getting my hands on a Cow Tongue was harder than you think. They are one of the first things to sell when we get a cow back from Chaudry’s.  Only because we took a 2nd cow in July did I get one. And I justified it with my birthday, my  wish was to make my kiddos dream of Mama making her favorite dish come true.

Now for the cooking it is a 2 part procedure. First you will boil the tongue with the spices. Next pull out the person in your house that likes to do weird science. Step three chop & fry in a pan.  After the boiling & weird science portion you could actually slice the tongue thinly as a roast. There are limited photos in this recipe as many of you have a strong ick factor.

Smoky BBQ Style Oven Brisket

Last weekend my family hosted the tween girls on the farm for dinner & movie. Having 4 tween girls between 3 families is full laughter and sometimes a tiny bit of drama, I brought the drama on myself this night. We made homemade pizzas for 3 of the girls then came the 4th, who has a strong dislike of pizza. For her I made oven smoked bbq style ribs. Next thing I hear from my very own Rutabaga. ” Mom, will you make me some BBQ Brisket for the 4th of July?”

Now for those of you who have met Rutabaga she is cute as can be. When she asks for something so sweetly & homemade to boot I can’t resist. Then to top it off she said those works all Momma’s want to hear. ” Mom, will you teach me how to make it too.” This led to a tiny bit of jealousy from Daddy who she normally bakes with. They are my baking team.  After the BBQ was going Daddy promptly made a cherry dump cake with Rutabaga to get in a cooking lesson himself.

With our recent March 1st price cut on Beef our brisket became alot more affordable. The price went from $12.99 lb to $9.25 lb, nice eh? Our briskets are also cut family style into quarters making them between 3-4 lbs each. Enough to feed a crowd. To top off the Brisket I used Buh’s The Sweet Side Sauce which retails in the NCF  Store for $5 a bottle.  I only used the sauce to drizzle across the brisket, leaving enough for at least 2 more dinners if not more.

Full disclosure- my smoker is off limits to me at the moment (I got sick).  If you want to to this on the smoker I recommend using hickory wood and keeping the grill at 225. Cook for 3-4 hours until fork tender. These smaller cuts cook quick so keep an eye on the heat. Always remember fat side up. If you need a little insurance cover extremely loosely in aluminum foil


Hickory Mustard Glazed Pork Tenderloin

Versatile glazes make my life turn round. While some prefer their meat & fish plain, including me at times, I love a glaze. During all of our food tastings this spring Dan & SWMBO came across Falling Bark Farm Hickory Syrup. I for one am thrilled they did, it goes great on Corn Bread, Salmon, & makes a great Old Fashioned. Now it is time to try it on meat, specifically pork.

At the same tasting SWMBO fell in love with Lusty Monk Mustard.  Lusty Monk has a spicy bite to it. It is great on Sandwiches.  Everyone here on the farm especially SWMBO recommend using it on our Bratwurst with Two Chicks Farm Sauerkraut.

This week marks my husband and I’s 20th Wedding Anniversary. Rutabaga was invited to unexpectedly to a friends house for an tweenage girl sleepover. That means Mom & Dad can eat like adults and Momma can play around with new ideas.

Pork Tenderloin sells for $13 lb. It is truly worth it for a special occasion.  The Falling Bark Hickory Syrup is $17 a bottle.  Lusty Monk Mustard sells for $6.95 a jar.  This is a special meal, and I know investing in these two ingredients will pay off for meals to come.

 

 

Parmesan Pork Chops

You’re probably going “Lucy knows it’s chicken parmesan, right?”. Yes I do know, when a craving hits & there is a chicken breast shortage hits (now remedied), you substitute. In this case I used Pork Chops from the NCF farm store coming in at $9.50 lb. It makes for a good fall meal on these still cooling off nights.

In my pictures you will notice the bone & extra fat. Don’t do what I did and leave those on. My crew was startled to find they couldn’t cut their meat under layers of sauce and cheese, from now on I will use my noodle a bit better and remove the extra fat as well as the bone.

There is no Parmesan cheese in Parmesan dishes. Why?? The dish is named for the area it is from in France.  Also I do not add my seasoning to the breading. I season the meat after egging. I’ve found that this adds a bit more flavor to my fried dishes. And please make sure to let the meat come to room temperature before frying. Cold meat in a fryer = burnt breading

You can’t have any. Hands off!

About a week ago, I posted that we had a new cut of pork in the freezer. It was just a little note at the end of a beef update. The cut of pork showed up and looked like this.

Boston butt pork steaks
New cuts! Boston butt steaks

I wasn’t really sure what it was. Lucy had attended the Women in Meat Conference and she and Brooke (Hi Brooke) from the processor had some sort of pow wow on new cuts Lucy wanted to bring in. I kinda tuned out of the conversation so I really didn’t know what she ordered.

So I’m unloading the truck and these things are in the box. Boston butt steaks. Looks cool, no idea what it is. Stick them in the freezer somewhere and worry about it later.

In talking to Lucy later, she informs me these are cut wrong and aren’t what she asked for. Go figure. I explained that this is what happens when we go out of the norm. Now we have 20 packs of these things that we’ll have to do something with but oh well, it’s ok. When you are a farmer, your mistakes taste like bacon!

Last night, SWMBO finally got around to cooking our first batch of these butt steak thingies. That’s how it is at our house. Something getting old? Something out of date? Something with damaged packaging? The farmer gets the stuff nobody wants, not the ribeyes.

Not knowing what else to do with these weird cuts, she just cooked them the way we do our pork chops, along with some peas from a bag and a bottle of vino (for the sauce and the chef!) She plated the steak thingies about 10 minutes after walking in the door and pushed one in front of me.

“They looked good. Hmm, they cut good, kinda tender like a porter house or a ribeye. They seem to have great marbling… if I didn’t know better, I’d think this was a steak….”

So I took a bite, and another. Good Lord these things are awesome! I didn’t really taste the pork flavor, they tasted more like a steak than a pork product. They were tender, juicy, flavorful. SWMBO said she tasted the pork and she’s probably right but I don’t care. They were awesome!

I ate mine. Then I gnawed the bone. Then the kids wandered off to play. I ate theirs. Then I was eyeing the one that was for lunch later but I decided to behave.

So we’ve got like 12 packs of these things I think. I’ll have to look when I steal them all and hide them from everyone so they don’t get sold. I think this is my new favorite thing! The only problem is, I’m not in the store today so hopefully nobody will know about our secret new cut till I get back home and can hide them from customers.

Nobody reads this blog, right? I’m safe.

Short ribs with asian flavor

Flavors from Asia,  they’re complex by nature. You bite in and instantly go “How did they do this”?  Umami is a word in Asian Cuisine used to describe the savory taste.  Short ribs have a bounty of Umami.

The ribs come in packs ranging from 1 lb- 2 lbs at $8.99 a lbs.   With ribs you want 1 lbs per person due to the removal of bone.  While this recipe is for 5 lbs I typically use 2-3 lbs of the ribs.  When doing this freeze part of your unused marinade for later use.

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The secret to short ribs is the cooking time.  Once again we are going to using that trusty dutch oven and set the oven at 280F.  The length of time will vary on the density of meat, towards the end check every 30 minutes.  You’re not just checking for fall off the bone you also want the connective tissue broken down enough to bite through easily.

 Short Ribs with Asian Flavor

  • 1 large Fuji apple
  • 1 large Asian pear
  • 1 ¼ cup soy sauce
  •  ¾ cup sugar
  •  1 red onion, roughly chopped
  •  4 green onions, chopped (optional)
  • 1 tbsp ginger, grated
  • 3 tbsp sesame seeds (optional)
  • ¼ cup sesame oil
  • 5 lbs Short ribs
  • Enough water to cover ribs
  • Green Onions, chopped (garnish)

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Cooking Method

  1. Preheat oven to 280F
  2.  For the marinade: Grate garlic, ginger, apple and pear into a large bowl, making sure to catch all of their juices.
  3. Add the soy sauce, sugar, onions,  sesame seeds, and sesame oil, mixing thoroughly.
  4. Place short ribs to the bowl, use tongs to ensure all of the ribs are coated with the marinade.
  5.  Refrigerate the meat & marinade for at least 12-24 hours before cooking. (The longer you marinate the meat, the better it flavor!)
  6. Remove from refrigerator 1 hour before cooking.
  7. In a Dutch oven place ribs & 1-2 cups of the marinade. Place in oven with the lid on 280 until tender 6-7 hrs.
  8. Remove and let sit for 10 minutes before removing ribs and breaking down the meat.
  9. While the meat cooks simmer the remaining marinade till syrupy & pour over finished ribs or serve beside them.
  10. Serve over rice or steamed vegetables.
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If you prefer fine dining break down the ribs after braising. The other option is the ever popular caveman style.