Tag Archives: pork

Hickory Mustard Glazed Pork Tenderloin

Versatile glazes make my life turn round. While some prefer their meat & fish plain, including me at times, I love a glaze. During all of our food tastings this spring Dan & SWMBO came across Falling Bark Farm Hickory Syrup. I for one am thrilled they did, it goes great on Corn Bread, Salmon, & makes a great Old Fashioned. Now it is time to try it on meat, specifically pork.

At the same tasting SWMBO fell in love with Lusty Monk Mustard.  Lusty Monk has a spicy bite to it. It is great on Sandwiches.  Everyone here on the farm especially SWMBO recommend using it on our Bratwurst with Two Chicks Farm Sauerkraut.

This week marks my husband and I’s 20th Wedding Anniversary. Rutabaga was invited to unexpectedly to a friends house for an tweenage girl sleepover. That means Mom & Dad can eat like adults and Momma can play around with new ideas.

Pork Tenderloin sells for $13 lb. It is truly worth it for a special occasion.  The Falling Bark Hickory Syrup is $17 a bottle.  Lusty Monk Mustard sells for $6.95 a jar.  This is a special meal, and I know investing in these two ingredients will pay off for meals to come.

 

 

Hot Dogs Back in Stock Open Today 2-6 pm

Great news just in time for the weekend. Weeping Radish dropped by this morning and delivered Uncured Hot Dogs, Beer Bratwurst, & Linguiça. Hopefully next week they will have our  Pastrami & Roast Beef ready for delivery.

Hot dogs $7 lb 4 per pack in pork casing

Linguica $10.50 lb

Beer Bratwurst $10.50lb

We’ll be sampling the new products this weekend, stock up for Memorial Day cookouts.

Alarita Citrus Pork Roast

Dan has been writing on the blog about all the taste testing on the farm, we’ve all put on a few extra pounds with it.  Now the products that we are going to carry have been handed off to me to make yummy lunches and dinners with.  Luckily I have a husband  & daughter who are adventurous eaters for the most part.

Today I’m aiming  for a savory sweet pork roast. One that livens up the dinner plate yet is balanced enough to not overwhelm the rest of the dinner. This is where Alarita comes in. Yesterday the sons of Miss La Rita came in with their salsa’s. We got to talking and we were throwing idea’s off of each other like the finals at Wimbledon.

With a pork roast you want to roast it at a low temperature giving the fat time to cook down and spread through the meat. Roughly an hour and fifteen minutes per pound. My favorite temperature to roast pork is at 280 degrees. Today with the citrus involved we are going a bit higher to 300 to get the sugar to play nice.

The Pork Butt & Picnic Roast both come in at $7.50 lb. The roast you see here weigh 2.66. And provide 1 meal for 4 and lunch for me. I had our neighbors Erin & Mark taste test the roast as well. All around everyone loved it. For lunch I used it to make lettuce wraps, and it was definitely just as great the 2nd time around.

Parmesan Pork Chops

You’re probably going “Lucy knows it’s chicken parmesan, right?”. Yes I do know, when a craving hits & there is a chicken breast shortage hits (now remedied), you substitute. In this case I used Pork Chops from the NCF farm store coming in at $9.50 lb. It makes for a good fall meal on these still cooling off nights.

In my pictures you will notice the bone & extra fat. Don’t do what I did and leave those on. My crew was startled to find they couldn’t cut their meat under layers of sauce and cheese, from now on I will use my noodle a bit better and remove the extra fat as well as the bone.

There is no Parmesan cheese in Parmesan dishes. Why?? The dish is named for the area it is from in France.  Also I do not add my seasoning to the breading. I season the meat after egging. I’ve found that this adds a bit more flavor to my fried dishes. And please make sure to let the meat come to room temperature before frying. Cold meat in a fryer = burnt breading

You can’t have any. Hands off!

About a week ago, I posted that we had a new cut of pork in the freezer. It was just a little note at the end of a beef update. The cut of pork showed up and looked like this.

Boston butt pork steaks
New cuts! Boston butt steaks

I wasn’t really sure what it was. Lucy had attended the Women in Meat Conference and she and Brooke (Hi Brooke) from the processor had some sort of pow wow on new cuts Lucy wanted to bring in. I kinda tuned out of the conversation so I really didn’t know what she ordered.

So I’m unloading the truck and these things are in the box. Boston butt steaks. Looks cool, no idea what it is. Stick them in the freezer somewhere and worry about it later.

In talking to Lucy later, she informs me these are cut wrong and aren’t what she asked for. Go figure. I explained that this is what happens when we go out of the norm. Now we have 20 packs of these things that we’ll have to do something with but oh well, it’s ok. When you are a farmer, your mistakes taste like bacon!

Last night, SWMBO finally got around to cooking our first batch of these butt steak thingies. That’s how it is at our house. Something getting old? Something out of date? Something with damaged packaging? The farmer gets the stuff nobody wants, not the ribeyes.

Not knowing what else to do with these weird cuts, she just cooked them the way we do our pork chops, along with some peas from a bag and a bottle of vino (for the sauce and the chef!) She plated the steak thingies about 10 minutes after walking in the door and pushed one in front of me.

“They looked good. Hmm, they cut good, kinda tender like a porter house or a ribeye. They seem to have great marbling… if I didn’t know better, I’d think this was a steak….”

So I took a bite, and another. Good Lord these things are awesome! I didn’t really taste the pork flavor, they tasted more like a steak than a pork product. They were tender, juicy, flavorful. SWMBO said she tasted the pork and she’s probably right but I don’t care. They were awesome!

I ate mine. Then I gnawed the bone. Then the kids wandered off to play. I ate theirs. Then I was eyeing the one that was for lunch later but I decided to behave.

So we’ve got like 12 packs of these things I think. I’ll have to look when I steal them all and hide them from everyone so they don’t get sold. I think this is my new favorite thing! The only problem is, I’m not in the store today so hopefully nobody will know about our secret new cut till I get back home and can hide them from customers.

Nobody reads this blog, right? I’m safe.

Parmesan Pork Chops

You’re probably going “Lucy knows it’s chicken parmesan, right?”. Yes I do know, when a craving hits & there is a chicken breast shortage hits (now remedied), you substitute. In this case I used Pork Chops from the NCF farm store coming in at $9.50 lb. It makes for a good fall meal on these still cooling off nights.

In my pictures you will notice the bone & extra fat. Don’t do what I did and leave those on. My crew was startled to find they couldn’t cut their meat under layers of sauce and cheese, from now on I will use my noodle a bit better and remove the extra fat as well as the bone.

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There is no parmesan cheese in Parmesan dishes. Why?? The dish is named for the area it is from in France.  Also I do not add my seasoning to the breading. I season the meat after egging. I’ve found that this adds a bit more flavor to my fried dishes. And please make sure to let the meat come to room temperature before frying. Cold meat in a fryer = burnt breading

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Ingredients

  • 4 NCF bone in pork chops
  • 2 cups bread crumbs
  • 2 eggs whisked
  • 3 tbsp Italian Herbs Seasoning
  • 1 cup Olive Oil
  • Salt & pepper
  • 8oz jar of Marinara (I prefer Nello’s)
  • 8 Slices Provolone or Mozzarella Cheese
  • 1/2 lb cooked pasta prepared to packages instructions

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Directions

  1. Preheat Oven to 350 degrees
  2. Dip Pork Chop in Egg
  3. Season Pork Chops with Salt Pepper and Italian Seasoning
  4. Cover Pork chop in breading (let rest 5 min before frying)
  5. In a heavy bottom pan heat Olive Oil to shimmering state
  6. Cooking 3-4 minutes on each side
  7. In a oven safe casserole add pasta cover lightly with marinara
  8. Lay Pork Chops on pasta, cover lightly with sauce then lay cheese across the top.
  9. Bake until cheese is bubbling,  rest meat, & serve

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Spiced Peach Glazed Ham Steaks

Processor pick up day is akin to Christmas morning for 5 yr olds here in the NCF store. The difference is we’re all closer to 40 than 5 and we’re getting giddy over new cuts of meat.  This week we received our first Uncured Ham Slice Steak. Hello new porky goodness to experiment with.

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The fat on these beautiful steaks is going to lead to a lovely crispy finish.

Today I’m going to serve up a Peach Jam Glazed Ham Slice. You’ll find much of my cooking has alcohol in it. As a Nashville girl Jack Daniel’s is a go to flavoring for me. Apple Cider Vinegar is Pork’s best friend. It enhances the flavor without adding a ton of unnecessary sodium.

First things first, just like Beef you want to bring your Pork Steak up to room temperature. An hour before you cook set it out.

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Trim the excess fat from steaks, I freeze my leftover fat to use in dishes later like collards, or to render into lard for cooking. Side note if I’m going to use the fat for collard or beans later it will get smoked first.

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Sauce

  • ½ cup Buck Naked Farm’s Peach Jam
  • 2 TBSP Jack Daniel’s
  • 1 tsp Apple Cider Vinegar

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Place ingredients in a small saucepan cook over a medium low heat till reduced.

Pork

*Pre-Heat broiler to 500 degrees F

*Use a heavy bottom skillet that is broiler safe

*Salt & pepper steaks to your taste

Pre Heat 2 tsp of EVOO (Extra Virgin Olive oil) over med-hi heat  place steaks into your skillet

Cook for 4-5 minutes until the steaks release from the pan without tearing. If you feel them stuck to the pan let go and wait.

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While waiting spoon ½ of your sauce over your steaks.  Once the meat releases from the pan flip them. Spoon your Sauce over the 2nd half of the steak. Place in the oven for 7 minutes.  When done place steaks on your serving platter and cover with foil for 5 minutes.

While these cool place your skillet back on the stove on medium heat. Use 1 cup of Pinot Grigio or your favorite light non-oaked white wine to deglaze your pan. Simmer down the sauce till thickened and pour over the steaks.

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