BEEF STROGANOFF OVER EGG NOODLES

There has been a bag of Amish Noodles staring at me from the pantry for a month. In July,  my daughter and I traveled to my home state of Missouri, the northwestern corner of the state up by Kansas, where Mennonite & Amish Markets abound. There I bought a bulk bag of Egg Noodles with dreams of Beef Stroganoff.

One of our big sellers is Beef for Stew.  I use it for many things soups, stews, kebabs, etc.   This meal is larger, feeding up to 8 people (Or my just my ravenous bunch of kids – Editor/Farmer).

Boneless Beef for stew runs $8.99 per pound with all of the ingredients listed you’ll have dinner for roughly $12-$15. If you want to jazz it up a bit use one of our Sirloin Steaks at $14.99 lb, thinly sliced with the fat removed.

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Store Manager and resident chef at Ninja Cow Farm LLC
Lucy lives and works on Ninja Cow Farm. Most days you'll find her tending to the garden or working in the store. She's cooked in restaurants and as a Personal Chef.

Hedy has her baby Henry #78

Yesterday morning Erin said Hedy looked like she was ready to pop. It just so happened that the vet was coming anyway, for something that will be another post. We walked out and looked at Hedy, who was huge but still eating bananas that’s we’d brought and otherwise seemed content.

The vet sorta shrugged her shoulders and said, “Hopefully she’ll deliver in the next few days.”

I was kinda thinking she’d deliver shortly.

About 3 hours later, we had this.

Jersey bull calf
Henry the newborn calf

Hedy had no issues whatsoever and delivered a pretty, perfect little bull calf. Sadly we were hoping for a girl but regardless he’s cute and perfect so we are happy.

This means we’ll be back in milk on schedule. It also means if you want to see the little cutie, he’s in the pasture right by the store so when you come for your goodies today, take a stroll out on this 62 degree day and meet Henry. 

Dan Moore on sabemailDan Moore on sabfacebookDan Moore on sabgoogleDan Moore on sabtwitter
Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he's a farmer.

We are open today, and a few words on bone broth

Edit- It’s just been pointed out to me that I’m talking about making stock in this post when I used the term broth. I personally only use stock for cooking, so that’s what I’m speaking of.

You don’t know how wonderful it is to say we are open normal hours. After last weekend’s cold, snowy, frozen, lingering tundra being open like normal feels great.

Spork feeding hogs in the snow
9 degrees out, feeding hogs. When everyone couldn’t get to work because of the weather, it was up to Spork and I to get everyone fed. 12 years old, working non-stop.

Wearing shorts the last two days in celebration of the weather felt pretty awesome too!

It seems that everyone has taken a new years resolution to make bone broths. It’s funny how things go in spurts. Normally we have a few customers making broth here or there but the last few weeks it’s been everyone walking in the door. I think this is great! Especially since we carry goodies for beef, chicken, pork, and lamb bone broths.

Bone broth is one of those things that people really just don’t know what they are missing. When they do look at making some, it seems daunting and too much trouble. I believe Lucy is going to post a recipe for bone broth so I won’t do the entire recipe but let me share my feelings on making it.

IT……IS…..EASY

Broth is one of those things that a commercial kitchen keeps going on a back burner. It never really finishes. When it’s too thick, add some water. When it’s too puny, chunk some more goodies in there. Needs salt, add a bit. Just taste and add and keep it going.

Should you follow a recipe? Sure, why not. It’ll give you some reference. Should you worry if you don’t have 6.7 oz of celery. Good Lord no. Broth is where all the scraps go. That stuff in the back of the crisper drawer that is left over from making dinner three nights ago. The half of a carrot and two sad looking stalks of celery. Chunk ’em in. Will it be different each time if you do that? Yep. It’s still broth, and it’s still good.

Here is the Farmer Dan’s stupid simple recipe.

Take a stock pot, add water. Chunk your bone/meaty bits in to boil. Bring the water up to a slow simmer. Go kiss your spouse or play with the kids for a bit. Now, open the fridge and root around and find all the orphaned veggies that look like they need a home. Whack ’em with a knife a few times and chunk ’em in.

Go eat lunch.

Come back, is the broth too watery? Go do that thing your wife has been on you to get done. She said 30 minutes. So plan on two hours to get it done.

Is it too thick?

Add a bit of water and let it go an hour to normalize.

Needs spices? Add some. Salt, pepper, whatever you want it to taste like.

Getting too late and it’s too watery because you took to long, then had to dump a bunch of water in? Turn it off before bed and start it up again tomorrow. Just leave it on the stove.

Just taste, test, and try it out. Here is the key. Bad bone broth is SO much better than what you’ll buy ANYWHERE that it’s worth it. If you mess it up, you still succeeded. People think it’s too much work. It’s not. It’s too fussy. God, it’s not, I hope I’ve conveyed that here.

Once your pot of broth is done (this will be between 4 hours and 4 days. Really! You can’t overcook this stuff. More time is just better.) Skim off the fat off of the top. Or don’t. It will look better if you do but won’t hurt a thing.

Realize that this stuff is more potent than regular store bought broth. Exponentially better. You will have to adjust your recipes. One neat thing to do with it when it’s done is to pour it into ice cube trays and let it freeze into ice cubes.

Then pop them out, put them in a ziplock back, and chunk them in the freezer.

Now when you need good broth, you just grab 3-4 cubes and drop them into the meal. Presto! Instant goodness and health.

Dan Moore on sabemailDan Moore on sabfacebookDan Moore on sabgoogleDan Moore on sabtwitter
Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he's a farmer.

JAMMIN’ CHICKEN

Jam, is it sitting in your fridge doing nothing? Is it only making an appearance at breakfast or on a noontime pbj? Well ladies and gentlemen let me introduce jam for dinner.  Triple Berry Jam is the primary ingredient in this sauce it is from Buck Naked Farm at $8 a jar sold in the NCF Store.

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At the NCF store the chicken is provided through Brittany Ridge Farms The Split Chicken Breast run $10 lb.  They typically come 2 to a pack.  With the kids we usually split a breast between them. the skin however is always fought over.

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Store Manager and resident chef at Ninja Cow Farm LLC
Lucy lives and works on Ninja Cow Farm. Most days you'll find her tending to the garden or working in the store. She's cooked in restaurants and as a Personal Chef.

GARBO CHICKEN & PASTA

A few years ago one of those boxed dinner companies came out with seasoning packets. You were just supposed to throw it in your meat and pasta or rice and poof dinner is served.  Upon looking at the ingredient list I was mortified. And then I looked at the nutrition. Whew! Who knew so much sodium could be packed into a couple of tablespoons.

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A few months back the NCF Store started carrying flavored Goat Cheeses from Celebrity Goat Dairy. Since then I have been playing around with them and having a blast. The little tubs sell for $5 each and are loaded full of flavor.  The flavors are Chocolate(hello adult s’mores anyone), mango, chipotle, garbo (herb), dillamon (dill with lemon pepper), chevre (plain), jalapeno, and curry.  Commonly I add goat cheese to dishes, it packs a punch of flavor  while low in fat.

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The next few meals I present are easy dinner on the run. Currently these 4 weeks are packed to the gills with activity. And if I ever schedule this much at once again… well lets just hope I don’t. The amount of time I have doesn’t allow for dinner out and fast food is being phased out of our house unless we are traveling.

Here we go, the NCF Chicken Skinless Boneless Chicken Breast is $11 lb, Garbo Goat Cheese $5, Peas-$1.69 (broccolli or carrots can be substituted), and Pasta $1.89 16 oz box.  Tell me can you feed a family of 4 at a fast food place for under $20? I can’t and keep everyone happy but I can with this and it’s done in 15 minutes.

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Store Manager and resident chef at Ninja Cow Farm LLC
Lucy lives and works on Ninja Cow Farm. Most days you'll find her tending to the garden or working in the store. She's cooked in restaurants and as a Personal Chef.

A very special scarf customer

Unfortunately I’m not able to be in the store as much anymore. With Lucy and the girls pretty much running the store now, I happen through and catch some of what is going on but I’m not there for every transaction like I used to be. It’s definitely a good thing but it makes me a bit out of touch on some of our transactions.

I have mentioned before about the hand-made scarves that the girls are making now. However it wasn’t until the other day that I learned who one of our customers was.

When I was little (0-6), I lived in a neighborhood in Garner. My best friend lived right across the street. I went to his house, he came to mine, all the time. When I moved to the farm, we stayed friends and he spent many a week out here running, climbing, fishing, etc. We still have lunch every few weeks to catch up, and his darling wife, Jennifer, is our beekeeper/soap maker/marketing guru.

I actually see more of Jennifer than I do anyone else since she comes out to the farm. Who I don’t see anymore, sadly, is their parents. I grew up with them like a second set of parents but in retirement they moved away to the beach so it’s been many years since I’ve had the chance to say hello.

However, through the power of scarves, I was able to reconnect, if only slightly, when I received this picture in my email the other day.

I had no idea that one of the scarves the girls sold was to Jennifer, who gave it to Paul, and that it ended up around the neck of this lovely lady. What a treat to have something hand-made by my girls end up with someone so special.

Dan Moore on sabemailDan Moore on sabfacebookDan Moore on sabgoogleDan Moore on sabtwitter
Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he's a farmer.

Why dads aren’t allowed to dress children

There is SNOW on the ground!

Spork and I had to run the farm since everyone else couldn’t get here. But the girls, they were free to go sledding to their heart’s content. As Spork and I were coming in to get something from the house after the first round of feeding critters, the girls were gearing up and heading out. As we all met in the middle at the front door, the kids all got together and were joking around. I grabbed a quick picture.

Kids in crazy winter hats
A pack of crazy

All three are wearing something weird on their heads. Spork is wearing my blaze orange fedora, the one with ear covers for when it’s cold.

The Princess is wearing a crazy mohawk toboggan thing complete with fluffy dangly bits. I bought this for her. I think it was supposed to be like a roman helmet.

Wildflower is wearing a bearded viking hat. Yes, you read that correctly. Here is what it looks like.

Yes, of course I bought this one too.

Now in my defense, I did not dress these kids. They did this all on their own. I may have…enabled them. But that’s not quite the same. 

But as I look at this picture, I notice a bit of contrast. 

Here is a better shot. 

Here is a mother’s handiwork. Matching clothes. Perfect light. Hair fixed. Cute.

Kids in crazy winter hats

And here is a fathers work. Exactly the same order as the picture in the background. Completely crazy. Completely lovable.

However, this is evidence why fathers are not supposed to handle dressing the kids.

Dan Moore on sabemailDan Moore on sabfacebookDan Moore on sabgoogleDan Moore on sabtwitter
Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he's a farmer.

7125 Old Stage Road Raleigh NC