We are sorta closed today, but open if you need us

Closed signPower is back on! Everything has weathered the storm very well but the roads are a bit messy and it is going to be rainy all day. We are not going to open the store today but we are going to be home. If anyone needs product, we are going to post Dan’s phone number on the door and you can just call when you get here. We’ll walk over and help you with what you need, no problem. We just aren’t going to open like normal.

This is a bit nostalgic for me, as this is how we used to work. We didn’t have store hours, but I met everyone one on one instead.

If you have cabin fever, feel free to stop by, we certainly don’t mind opening up for you. Just know we might be in our jammies. ūüôā

We should be back to normal on Monday.

Dan Moore on EmailDan Moore on FacebookDan Moore on GoogleDan Moore on Twitter
Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he's a farmer.

We are closed today

Closed signWith hurricane Florence overhead, and our power out since 2am, we are pulling the plug on having the store open today. We will make a decision on tomorrow once we know what the power crews are able to do.

So far we don’t have any real damage, fingers crossed it stays that way!

Good luck everyone with the storm.

Dan Moore on EmailDan Moore on FacebookDan Moore on GoogleDan Moore on Twitter
Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he's a farmer.

Cow milk is back!

As promised, I’m letting everyone know that we have cow milk coming back to the store starting next week. Calves are on the ground, milk is flowing, and we’ll be bottling starting next week in preparation for putting milk in the store.

Currently I’m planning on making our first pickup next Thursday which means we’ll have it in the store on Friday.¬†Hurricane Florence spaghetti map with wing picture

Of course, all of this is Lord willing. We have some excitement headed our way in the name of Florence. It is hard to take some of the weather forecasts seriously because everything is so overhyped but when I look at the current spaghetti models map (my favorite) I see that there is a good chance we are going to get a good smack from this one. Since Spork and I both work with the Civil Air Patrol, and we have a farm to keep running and multiple families to keep safe, we may be too busy to get milk in the store next week. But sooner or later we’ll have cows milk in the store for purchase. Of course, we’ll keep our goats milk on hand as we transition over so you fine folks have something for the fridge.

Dan Moore on EmailDan Moore on FacebookDan Moore on GoogleDan Moore on Twitter
Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he's a farmer.

Beef has just been restocked, as well as pork and chicken

Sorry to tease you on the steaks
Steaks and burgers, ready for the fire.

This week was a busy week. Friday I picked up a cow at the processor and Jeanette put it away Friday afternoon. That means the beef freezer is full to bursting with all the cuts of beef, including ribeyes and filet mignon.

I also made my normal weekly trip to restock on chicken, milk, eggs, etc where I meet my chicken farmer at the pork processor (it is our normal meeting place). While I was there I restocked on pork as I had a hog there waiting for me. About 400 pounds of pork!

So all three freezers, beef, pork, and chicken are full and ready for you. The girls are working today and I do believe they are making homemade cookies. Spork and I will likely be working on the airplane in the shop so we’ll be around as well. Stop by and say hello and stock up on some meaty goodness.

Dan Moore on EmailDan Moore on FacebookDan Moore on GoogleDan Moore on Twitter
Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he's a farmer.

We finally have a phone in the store, 919-322-0197

Old Phone
Welcome to the 19th century

After five + years, I’ve finally been able to get service out to the barn to get a telephone line (and also dedicated internet). For those of you who call to make sure we have something in stock before coming, you can now actually get an answer.

The way it was in the past was my personal cell phone was the store number, so people would call me to ask if we had:

  • A gallon of milk
  • Ribeyes in stock
  • Is my wife there
  • Etc

Of course I’m usually knee deep in cow poop, getting parts for a tractor, or simply over at the house and don’t actually have visibility to the store. Usually I have a decent idea of what we have on hand but I always answer with the caveat that, “we had X when I looked, but that was several hours ago. No promises.”

Now when you call, you’ll be dialing directly into the store so whoever is working can look in the freezer/fridge and tell you exactly what we have and even hold it for you if you are coming shortly. A much better system.

We were also able to get a new dedicated voice mail so I was able to put things like our store hours, our website address, and my email address in the message. Those three pieces of information probably answer 1/2 of the calls I receive.

I know, welcome to the 19th century. Alexander Bell would be so proud of us.

Dan Moore on EmailDan Moore on FacebookDan Moore on GoogleDan Moore on Twitter
Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he's a farmer.

We will be closed Monday for Labor Day

closed for labor day

We’ll be closed Monday, but open today, Friday, and Saturday. We are fully stocked on beef, pork, chicken, and dairy products so grab your goodies.

Dan Moore on EmailDan Moore on FacebookDan Moore on GoogleDan Moore on Twitter
Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he's a farmer.

NRCS grazing on field by the ponds

This is our last post on the NRCS program for our second field, the field by the ponds. This field is located in a little corner formed between the lower pond, the trees between Old Stage Road/our driveway, and the pasture in front of my house. 

With the weather this year, grass has simply not been a problem. Lots of rain, relatively cool days (for NC) and not that much pressure from our finishing herd means that we have more than enough grass. In fact we’ve been grazing more than one day on a paddock just to get enough of the grass eaten.¬†

Here you can see the grass, full and tall. It runs about 14″ tall and we have 100% ground coverage. This has been about as good as it gets for a grazing season.¬†

Post grazing, after several days of grazing, there is still a lot of grass left. But more importantly there is a lot of grass that has been trampled and left in contact with the ground. This is topsoil we’ll be building the rest of the season.¬†

Even after several days, the grass is still 6-8″ tall and we still have 100% ground coverage. This field can recover almost instantly and begin growing new grass for the next rotation, which will likely include the brood herd as they come home from summer grazing.

Dan Moore on EmailDan Moore on FacebookDan Moore on GoogleDan Moore on Twitter
Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he's a farmer.

We are hosting a mud run at the farm September 15th

Two actually.

The first one will be September 15th and will be a full bore mud run with constructed and natural obstacles. We’ll be using a part of the farm that none of you have ever visited before so even our repeat customers will get to see something new.

Here is a short description of the event from the organizer.

Dragon Obstacle Course Race is very excited to have their next event on September 15th, 2018 at Ninja Cow Farm; 7125 Old Stage Road Raleigh, NC.  Dragon OCR will have a mix of fun and challenging obstacles, something for everyone.

The course will have Cargo Nets, Atlas Stones, Huge Tires, Inverted Walls, A-frames, Slackline, Rope Traverse, and many more obstacles.

Every Dragon OCR race finisher will receive a custom medal and finisher t-shirt. Visit www.DragonOCR.com for registration and further details.

We are going to have another event in October that will be similar, but definitely unique as well. Both events will have food, fun, and lots to keep you or the family entertained. More details will be coming about the second event but for now, keep September 15th on your schedule.

Dan Moore on EmailDan Moore on FacebookDan Moore on GoogleDan Moore on Twitter
Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he's a farmer.

Beef is coming and pork is on sale

After last month’s sale on beef was such a success, I decided we should do a sale this month on pork. So we are repeating our sale of 15% off all pork products (except bacon). We are well stocked on pork, with more being picked up tomorrow and even more the next few weeks so we should have everything you need to fill your freezer.

Our pork is like none you’ve ever had. No grain, no corn, no commercial feed ever. If you haven’t tried it, you simply are missing out. It is unlike any pork you’ve ever had, I promise.

Also I’m taking a cow this Friday to the processor so we’ll be restocked on all beef cuts in about a week. Plan on getting your steaks and hamburger while you are in.

We are open Monday-Wednesday-Friday from 2pm-6pm and Saturdays from 9am-5pm. And don’t forget, we give free tours on Saturdays. Just sign up for a tour online.

Dan Moore on EmailDan Moore on FacebookDan Moore on GoogleDan Moore on Twitter
Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he's a farmer.

NRCS grazing update

This year marks the last year of our NRCS grazing monitoring program. This has been an excellent program where all we needed to do was to take before and after pictures of our grazing in strategic locations at least once per year. We then documented the grass growth and then consumption. When all the work is done properly, we get a check at the end of the year. Easy peasy.

So for the pasture closest to the golf course, here is the last grazing update.

Before grazing, the view in the paddock
Before grazing, the view in the paddock

Normally by this time of year we are dealing with hot and dry weather. And we do have hot, but we had some timely wet weather just before this week. The grass was vibrant and lush. The cool season grasses have just about gone dormant and the thick, warm season grasses are enjoying the combination of unlimited sun and some water when it is needed. The grass is anywhere from 10″ to 15″ tall and very thick.

We are only grazing about 14 cows on rotation right now. The rest are at our other farm. This particular paddock, due to leaving a gap for the pigs to be fed in the paddock system, was to be grazed two days.

Pasture with excellent grass stand
Lush grass as far as you can see

Johnson grass is popping up across the pasture as well. You can see some in the right of the picture (the patch of taller than normal grass). It never seems to be in the same place, but the cows absolutely love it and eat it immediately to the ground. Johnson grass is the bane of many row crop farmers but I love that it grows in our pastures, because our cows love it.

after grazing for two days, picture with grazing stake
After grazing for two days

The grass is definitely showing signs of having been grazing, but it is still 5-6″ tall and very thick. This is perfect for regrowth and for building topsoil. Also much of the brown stems from the cool season grass that has gone dormant is now broken off and therefore pressed down to the ground. Grass litter in contact with the ground is what makes topsoil. So we’ve fed our cows, and fed our soil, all at the same time.

A little better view of the after grazing conditions
A little better view of the after grazing conditions

After this picture, we pulled up this grazing stake getting a steel pole out of the middle of the pasture and marking the end of our NRCS program for this pasture. This allows us to mow easier, and it also allows us to get ready for our next usage of the pasture next year. 

Dan Moore on EmailDan Moore on FacebookDan Moore on GoogleDan Moore on Twitter
Dan is a dad, a husband, a business owner, a pilot, a sailor, a scuba diver, a machinist, a gunsmith, a welder, a woodworker, a day laborer, a teacher, a mentor and a writer. The short form of all the previous is he's a farmer.